“Letters of Decline: Four Tales of Job Interview Horror” (Review)

The Conqueror Weird gives a very positive review to LETTERS OF DECLINE!

The Conqueror Weird

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Letters of Decline: Four Tales of Job Interview Horror
by Joseph Pastula, Matthew M. Bartlett, Sean M. Thompson, and Jonathan Raab

Hello, everybody. Welcome back to the second installment of “What in Beelzebub’s unholy name have those Orford Parish Books boys gotten up to now?” You may remember the first time we looked at the exploits of Orford Parish Books, probably because it wasn’t too long ago as the blog flies. That post covered such diverse topics as murder houses, picture books, the American flag, and wrestling.

Now we zone in a bit on their most recent publication, a self-styled “split chapbook” entitled Letters of Decline: Four Tales of Job Interview Horror. As the title suggests, it contains four weird horror narratives, all of which relate to the nerve-wracking experience of a job interview. Orford Parish Books has not yet failed to pick a…

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Spooklights #20: Jeremy Robert Johnson

Jeremy Robert Johnson joins us to discuss horror-as-influence on a not-necessarily-a-horror-author, SKULLCRACK CITY, ENTROPY IN BLOOM, night terrors, rural vs. urban, and so much more. Dude’s an excellent writer, humble and hungry AF, and you’d do well to read his work. Also I mumble-mouth my way through the opening description, and at some point we talk about drugs.

http://www.jeremyrobertjohnson.com/

Music by Terrortron: terrortron.bandcamp.com/

HIVE by Alex Smith (Book Review)

A glowing review of HIVE from Splatterpunk Zine!

splatterpunkzine

HIVE by Alex Smith (Muzzleland Press)

With HIVE, Alex Smith explores the world of urban paranoia with a Cronenbergian precision. The story follows the relationship of Mark and Carolyn as they try to piece things together following the decision to have an abortion. The act causes an emotional rift in their relationship, which they seek to close by moving out of their matchbox sized, loft apartment. As you can expect, it’s upon moving into their new apartment where things start to get creepy and weird. As to not spoil any more of the plot, let me just say that what follows is goddamn awesome.

Despite it’s short length, Smith manages to pack a whole lot of emotional realism in to the main characters and the rebuilding of their relationship. For all its paranoia, HIVE is a deeply human book. In that way, I wouldn’t be surprised if Smith was, along…

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The Siren Song of Spin Offs: A Review of SiRen

Review by Billy Lyons

Horror anthologies have always been my favorite.  I cut my teeth on the 1970s classics, movies like Torture Garden, The Uncanny, and The Vault of Horror. What made these films so special was their extremely high quality. The majority were produced by industry giants Hammer and Amicus, written by folks like Robert Bloch and Richard Matheson, and performed by masters such as Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. Continue reading “The Siren Song of Spin Offs: A Review of SiRen”

Creature-Feature Conversations: Hellraiser: Bloodline

Creature-Feature Conversations is a series of informal discussions about obscure, unique, or cult horror films, primarily from the 80s and 90s.

Orrin Grey is a skeleton who likes monsters, movies, and especially monster movies. His stories have appeared in dozens of anthologies, including Ellen Datlow’s Best Horror of the Year, and been collected in Never Bet the Devil & Other Warnings and Painted Monsters & Other Strange Beasts. From 2011 until 2016 he wrote a monthly column on vintage horror cinema for Innsmouth Free Press that has now been collected into Monsters from the Vault. You can visit him online at orringrey.com.

Jonathan Raab is the author of The Lesser Swamp Gods of Little Dixie, The Hillbilly Moonshine Massacre, and Flight of the Blue Falcon. His novella Cold Call is featured in Turn to Ash’s Open Lines anthology. You can read his short story “The Secret Goatman Spookshow” in the Lovecraft eZine.

Hellraiser: Bloodline (dir. Alan Smithee, 1996.)

JR: After our last entry proved to be pretty popular (and, curiously, controversial, considering how many people actually like Hellraiser III), I figured, why not check out the sequel? I remember back in my early high school days purchasing this VHS from Media Play in their horror section, it being the only Hellraiser film they had that wasn’t $30, back when horror movies were hard to come by and my knowledge of the form was woefully limited to what I could afford to purchase or what my cousins happened to record on HBO and Showtime off satellite TV. After seeing the Scream movies I just knew I had to be literate in horror cinema, but my options were pretty limited. I very easily could have purchased another movie—any horror movie, really—but something about the simple box art (Pinhead in profile, if I remember correctly) and premise caught my attention, especially considering my interest in the series spurred on by my enjoyment of the censored-for-TV cuts aired during AMC’s Monsterfest. Continue reading “Creature-Feature Conversations: Hellraiser: Bloodline”