Faithful Frighteners: M.S. Corley

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with people of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes.

M.S. Corley is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer specializing in book covers and character design. His work also includes video game concept art and comic book art. His clients include Simon & Schuster, Thomas & Mercer, Crossing, Skyscape, 47North, Valancourt Books, Henry Holt Macmillan, Dark Horse Comics, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Microsoft, and Random House.

 

JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

MC: I never thought of it exactly as a culture, but I remember being very young and going into libraries and I’d go to the ‘paranormal’ section of the books, look up things like bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, UFOs, ghosts, etc. I’ve  always had a fascination with the supernatural and unexplainable but I’m not sure of the root cause for that, I’ve had my own experiences but that didn’t come til much later in life so I don’t know the exact genesis…

But since the beginning, literature in specific has been what I’ve been interested in, I’m not a huge fan of horror movies (can’t stand gore of any kind) but I do really enjoy the classic universal monster movies—would those be considered horror? They have monsters and stuff but they aren’t scary, great atmosphere. At the end of the day that’s what I like. Give me the fear without having to kill things in an absurd manner.

 

Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: M.S. Corley”

the city can change so quickly: An interview with Alex Smith, author of HIVE

Alex Smith is the author of Muzzleland Press’ latest novella, HIVE, a Cronenbergian descent into urban paranoia, reproduction, body horror, abortion, and so much more.

Consider supporting the press by purchasing the book for Kindle here or in paperback.

What is HIVE?

HIVE is a short book about a couple that move to a nice new apartment in Queens, only to find their darkest fears about parenthood, life, death, and birth will be realized. HIVE is so short that saying more gives it away. I had this great experience of reading a short book called The Beckoning Fair One from start to finish on a flight from New York to Las Vegas. I wanted to write something that could be read in one or two sittings (with or without air travel) but that had enough substance to feel like a light meal, not a snack. I like to think of HIVE as a horror story where the characters matter as much as the horror.

Continue reading “the city can change so quickly: An interview with Alex Smith, author of HIVE”

Faithful Frighteners: Leeman Kessler

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with persons of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes.

Leeman Kessler is a Nigerian-born American actor who, since 2010, has been depicting H.P. Lovecraft on stage and online as part of his popular web-series, Ask Lovecraft. He is a co-host on the horror podcast Miskatonic Musings as well as the Christian/Pop-Culture podcast Geekually Yoked. He is a missionary kid married to an Episcopal priest and spends most of his day chasing after his daughter Amanda. His short fiction has appeared in Resonator, Cthulhu Lies Dreaming, and Weirdbook #32.


JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

jm1.18.15-5LK: I was a Blockbuster junkie in high school and even wound up working there over many summer and winter breaks during undergrad. The horror section was one I returned to again and again. I loved the cheese and the ridiculousness and the sense that those movies were getting away with something. I was more a fan of the comic supernatural series like Leprechaun or Child’s Play or Night of the Demons than slashers or suspense horror. Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: Leeman Kessler”

Faithful Frighteners: Daniel Mills

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with persons of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes.

Daniel Mills (http://www.daniel-mills.net) is the author of Revenants (Chomu Press, 2011), The Lord Came at Twilight (Dark Renaissance Books, 2014), The Account of David Stonehouse, Exile (Dim Shores, 2016), and the forthcoming Moriah (ChiZine Publications, 2017).

 

JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

D Mills Author Photo (1)
Daniel Mills

DM: It’s difficult to pinpoint a “when” or a “how” since as far as I can remember I have always had an interest in horror. I can recall being four years old and watching Disney’s Darby O’Gill and the Little People then repeatedly rewinding/re-watching the climactic scenes with the banshee and phantom coach. I was also deeply affected by Schwartz and Gammel’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark anthology series and remember reading myself into a frenzy of terror night after night long after I was old enough to know better. Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: Daniel Mills”

Faithful Frighteners: Tom Breen

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with persons of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes. You can read the first interview with Scott R. Jones here.

Tom Breen is the author of Orford Parish Murder Houses: A Visitor’s Guide and co-author of Old Gory: Two Tales of Flag Horror. He also co-manages Orford Parish Books, which “specializes in the unsettling, the weird, the subtly troubling. Short fiction, illustrated books for strange children, themed chapbooks, [and] fake newspapers[.]”

JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

Tom BreenTB: When I was a kid, I was fascinated by collections of ghost stories, books about “real life” hauntings, and horror movies. This lasted until 6th grade, when I was 11 or 12, and my teacher decided all of these things, plus Dungeons & Dragons, were making me a danger to myself and others. Well, it was a different time (the 1980s, to be specific).

So I had to make weekly visits to the school psychologist, and any interest in the macabre was pretty much therapy’d out of me by the helping professions. This lasted until I was in college. For reasons that are now obscure to me, I started reading H.P. Lovecraft, an author my father liked. That was really it, though; I still had an aversion, bred by that early adolescent experience, to anything horror-related. I remember being 23 years old and driving to Chicago with friends, and being legitimately worried about reading a Ramsey Campbell book I had brought with me. I don’t know what I was worried about, I just had some deep, weird anxiety about plunging into this (literally, when I was younger) forbidden world. Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: Tom Breen”

Faithful Frighteners: Scott R. Jones

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with persons of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes.

Scott R. Jones is owner and project editor of Martian Migraine Press, a  transgressive weird small press out of Canada. His latest anthology, Cthulhusattva: Tales of the Black Gnosis is available now.

 

JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

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Scott R. Jones

SRJ: If we’re going to go all the way back to the moment I became aware of horror, I would have to relate the moment in grade school when a classmate brought in the comics adaptation of the Creepshow anthology film. Something about the artwork (I think it was a predominantly Bernie Wrightson effort, wasn’t it?); I still vividly recall the revulsion I felt at the depiction of strands of saliva stretching between the teeth and lips of screaming victims. “Father’s Day,” and that one where the murderer buries his victims up to their necks at the shore before the tide comes in. The effect on me was deep; so troubling that when I heard Stephen King’s name mentioned on the radio weeks later, I burst into tears. But, y’know, I was ten.

I’m guessing it wasn’t until my early twenties that I got into horror fiction. I consider myself fortunate that my first adult exposure was to Ramsey Campbell (his Cold Print was a revelation), and from him I moved on into the other weird authors (Lovecraft et al.), many of which fared badly in comparison to Campbell. Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: Scott R. Jones”