Aspiring Critics, Take Note!

We’re looking for reviews of horror culture – films, video games, books, short stories, and everything in between. The subject matter can be new or old; we love the classics and enjoy discovering new terrors!

Length: 500 – 1000 words

Submit a .doc, .odt, or .rtf file to editor@muzzlelandpress.com, with the subject line “Review Submission.”

Include in your email a preferred byline, and a short bio that we will use at the end of the review.

 

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Book Review: Come on down to Little Dixie, ya’ll

The Little Dixie Horror Show by Mer Whinery

Published by Literati Press; available in e-book and print formats

Mer Whinery’s collection of location-specific horror stories run a unique gamut: ghostly ghoulish lot lizards, the selling of your soul for comfort and new chances, children turning to rational (hallucinogenic?) violence, a beautiful short about a haunted movie house, and a decidedly unserious novella about a transvestite monster hunter.

The sheer variety of these bizarre and genuinely creepy tales is supported by the main character – the setting. Little Dixie is a spot in Oklahoma where all the worst parts of the Deep South uprooted and made their home, spawning generations of cultural, economic, and spiritual malaise. It’s a place of deep dark and people with secrets. Whinery shows us the darkest corners of Little Dixie, sparing no detail in what amounts to grisly, gore-ific, and straight up disturbing close ups on what goes bump in the night out yonder.

Whinery’s stories, while dripping with horror, are also full of love for a bizarre and dying community of swamps, abandoned truck stops, and both the living and the dead.

I’ll buy anything Whinery publishes next. His sense of voice is fantastic, and he’s got a great appreciation for horror (Lucio Fulci gets more than a few references) literature, films, and culture.

My only complaint about the book is the editing. Another pass or two by an editor would have made a world of difference in catching a variety of errors. If my criticism seems petty, good. Because a few misspelled words and clunky fonts shouldn’t dissuade you from grabbing this spookhouse ride of an underground collection.

5/5 Ghoul-infested Truck Stops

Call for Submissions – Spooklights Anthology

Our first-ever publication, Spooklights, will feature literary horror and supernatural tales by authors around the country. We’d love to feature a few additional stories by up-and-coming authors in literary genre fiction!

Deadline: July 6, 2014

Payment: 10 contributor’s copies

Length: 1000 – 5000 words

Looking for: horror, supernatural, or generally weird original tales; well-written with a good sense of voice, atmosphere, and originality; unique settings, characters, or perspectives; creative use of horror standbys; stories that are creepy, scary, or just plain fun.

Not looking for: tired tropes used in conventional ways (zombies, unless you do something new with them), straight serial killer tales, or cliche-ridden fiction [Lovecraftian mythos/pastiche is welcome, if well-done and original].

Gore, violence, sex, etc. okay if used tastefully. The point of a good literary horror story is not death, violence, and dismemberment,  but a message that says something about fear, humanity, and evil.

The collection will be sold as an e-book and print edition through online distributors like Amazon, and as a print copy in local book stores in Denver and Mankato, MN, at conventions, and artist outlets. Publication will occur in fall.

Every submission will receive a personalized response.

To submit:

Send an email with the story attached as a .pdf, .doc/.docx, .odt, .rtf, or pasted into the body of the email. Use a simple font, 12-point, one inch margins, with your name, phone number, and email address on the title page. Number your pages if sent as an attachment. Colored or wacky fonts will send your story to the recycle bin.

In your email, state the name of the story, the basic premise, the word count, and any previous publication information (if you have any; not necessary). Tell us what the story means to you personally, and why you wrote it.

Send submissions to: editor@muzzlelandpress.com

 

Please see our Submission and Guidelines page for additional requirements.