The Horror of Public Transportation: Recent Reads

One of the advantages of taking the bus when your commute is 45 minutes to an hour? Well, besides stealing all sorts of interesting characterization from your fellow bus-riders, you can read. A lot.

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Pathfinder RPG: Horror Adventures

I’ve been getting back into tabletop roleplaying, specifically the Pathfinder RPG, with a group of coworkers. I picked this 2016 release up last month (before I started riding the bus, admittedly), and I don’t regret it. It’s a great supplement to the game (think Dungeons & Dragons) that takes Pathfinder one step closer to Call of Cthulhu territory. I also recommend this as an inspiration tome for horror writers. Every page has awesome horror ideas and hooks. Check out our most recent episode of Spooklights for the full take: Spooklights #13: The Book of Blasphemous Words Continue reading “The Horror of Public Transportation: Recent Reads”

Creature-Feature Conversations: Phenomena

Creature-Feature Conversations is a series of informal discussions about obscure, unique, or cult horror films, primarily from the 80s and 90s.

Orrin Grey is a skeleton who likes monsters, movies, and especially monster movies. His stories have appeared in dozens of anthologies, including Ellen Datlow’s Best Horror of the Year, and been collected in Never Bet the Devil & Other Warnings and Painted Monsters & Other Strange Beasts. From 2011 until 2016 he wrote a monthly column on vintage horror cinema for Innsmouth Free Press that has now been collected into Monsters from the Vault. You can visit him online at orringrey.com.

Jonathan Raab is the author of The Lesser Swamp Gods of Little Dixie, The Hillbilly Moonshine Massacre, and Flight of the Blue Falcon. His novella Cold Call is featured in Turn to Ash’s Open Lines anthology. You can read his short story “The Secret Goatman Spookshow” in the Lovecraft eZine.

Phenomena (aka Creepers) (dir. Dario Argento, 1985)

OG: The first time I saw Phenomena—years ago, now—not only had I never seen a Dario Argento movie before, I didn’t even know the word giallo yet. So, needless to say, I had no idea what I was getting myself into, and didn’t really know what to make of the experience when I was done. I still kinda liked it, even then, but it was a lot better revisiting it now that I’m at least a little more familiar with both Argento and gialli. Continue reading “Creature-Feature Conversations: Phenomena”

Faithful Frighteners: M.S. Corley

Faithful Frighteners is a series of interviews with people of faith in the horror and weird fiction scenes.

M.S. Corley is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer specializing in book covers and character design. His work also includes video game concept art and comic book art. His clients include Simon & Schuster, Thomas & Mercer, Crossing, Skyscape, 47North, Valancourt Books, Henry Holt Macmillan, Dark Horse Comics, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Microsoft, and Random House.

 

JR: How, when, and why did you get into horror culture (film, literature, video games, etc)?

MC: I never thought of it exactly as a culture, but I remember being very young and going into libraries and I’d go to the ‘paranormal’ section of the books, look up things like bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, UFOs, ghosts, etc. I’ve  always had a fascination with the supernatural and unexplainable but I’m not sure of the root cause for that, I’ve had my own experiences but that didn’t come til much later in life so I don’t know the exact genesis…

But since the beginning, literature in specific has been what I’ve been interested in, I’m not a huge fan of horror movies (can’t stand gore of any kind) but I do really enjoy the classic universal monster movies—would those be considered horror? They have monsters and stuff but they aren’t scary, great atmosphere. At the end of the day that’s what I like. Give me the fear without having to kill things in an absurd manner.

 

Continue reading “Faithful Frighteners: M.S. Corley”

Creature-Feature Conversations: Screamers

Creature-Feature Conversations is an ongoing series of informal discussions about obscure, unique, or cult horror films.

Orrin Grey is a skeleton who likes monsters, movies, and especially monster movies. His stories have appeared in dozens of anthologies, including Ellen Datlow’s Best Horror of the Year, and been collected in Never Bet the Devil & Other Warnings and Painted Monsters & Other Strange Beasts. From 2011 until 2016 he wrote a monthly column on vintage horror cinema for Innsmouth Free Press that has now been collected into Monsters from the Vault. You can visit him online at orringrey.com.

Jonathan Raab is the author of The Lesser Swamp Gods of Little Dixie, The Hillbilly Moonshine Massacre, and Flight of the Blue Falcon. His novella Cold Call will be featured in Turn to Ash’s Open Lines anthology. You can read his short story “The Secret Goatman Spookshow” in the Lovecraft eZine.

Screamers (dir. Christian Duguay, 1995)

JR: I knew almost nothing about this movie going in, save it involves killer robots and is a Philip K. Dick adaptation. A co-worker shoved it in my hands and told me I’d like it, and he wasn’t wrong. It’s a movie that’s better than it deserves to be, mostly due to what I assume is the steady script by genre favorite Dan O’Bannon. I figured this would be a middling creature-feature about rampaging mechanical monsters. And while it is certainly that, there’s a lot more going on under the surface.

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Continue reading “Creature-Feature Conversations: Screamers”